Network security

It’s a basic principle, but following password best practices is a simple and highly effective way to maintain network security. Many people create passwords that aren’t strong, reuse previous passwords and don’t use unique passwords for each of their accounts. Encourage all employees to follow password best practices, especially for their work accounts, as it can help keep everyone’s data safe.

An open padlock sits on top of a silver laptop computer

Benefits of Network Security

Network Security is vital in protecting client data and information, keeping shared data secure and ensuring reliable access and network performance as well as protection from cyber threats. A well designed network security solution reduces overhead expenses and safeguards organizations from costly losses that occur from a data breach or other security incident. Ensuring legitimate access to systems, applications and data enables business operations and delivery of services and products to customers.

Firewall

Firewalls control incoming and outgoing traffic on networks, with predetermined security rules. Firewalls keep out unfriendly traffic and is a necessary part of daily computing. Network Security relies heavily on Firewalls, and especially Next Generation Firewalls, which focus on blocking malware and application-layer attacks.

Network Segmentation

Network segmentation defines boundaries between network segments where assets within the group have a common function, risk or role within an organization. For instance, the perimeter gateway segments a company network from the Internet. Potential threats outside the network are prevented, ensuring that an organization’s sensitive data remains inside. Organizations can go further by defining additional internal boundaries within their network, which can provide improved security and access control.

What is Access Control?

Access control defines the people or groups and the devices that have access to network applications and systems thereby denying unsanctioned access, and maybe threats. Integrations with Identity and Access Management (IAM) products can strongly identify the user and Role-based Access Control (RBAC) policies ensure the person and device are authorized access to the asset.

Remote Access VPN

Remote access VPN provides remote and secure access to a company network to individual hosts or clients, such as telecommuters, mobile users, and extranet consumers. Each host typically has VPN client software loaded or uses a web-based client. Privacy and integrity of sensitive information is ensured through multi-factor authentication, endpoint compliance scanning, and encryption of all transmitted data.

Zero Trust Network Access (ZTNA)

The zero trust security model states that a user should only have the access and permissions that they require to fulfill their role. This is a very different approach from that provided by traditional security solutions, like VPNs, that grant a user full access to the target network. Zero trust network access (ZTNA) also known as software-defined perimeter (SDP) solutions permits granular access to an organization’s applications from users who require that access to perform their duties.

Email Security

Email security refers to any processes, products, and services designed to protect your email accounts and email content safe from external threats. Most email service providers have built-in email security features designed to keep you secure, but these may not be enough to stop cybercriminals from accessing your information.

Data Loss Prevention (DLP)

Data loss prevention (DLP) is a cybersecurity methodology that combines technology and best practices to prevent the exposure of sensitive information outside of an organization, especially regulated data such as personally identifiable information (PII) and compliance related data: HIPAA, SOX, PCI DSS, etc.

Intrusion Prevention Systems (IPS)

IPS technologies can detect or prevent network security attacks such as brute force attacks, Denial of Service (DoS) attacks and exploits of known vulnerabilities. A vulnerability is a weakness for instance in a software system and an exploit is an attack that leverages that vulnerability to gain control of that system. When an exploit is announced, there is often a window of opportunity for attackers to exploit that vulnerability before the security patch is applied. An Intrusion Prevention System can be used in these cases to quickly block these attacks.

Sandboxing

Sandboxing is a cybersecurity practice where you run code or open files in a safe, isolated environment on a host machine that mimics end-user operating environments. Sandboxing observes the files or code as they are opened and looks for malicious behavior to prevent threats from getting on the network. For example malware in files such as PDF, Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint can be safely detected and blocked before the files reach an unsuspecting end user.

Hyperscale Network Security

Hyperscale is the ability of an architecture to scale appropriately, as increased demand is added to the system. This solution includes rapid deployment and scaling up or down to meet changes in network security demands. By tightly integrating networking and compute resources in a software-defined system, it is possible to fully utilize all hardware resources available in a clustering solution.

Robust Network Security Will Protect Against

  • Virus: A virus is a malicious, downloadable file that can lay dormant that replicates itself by changing other computer programs with its own code. Once it spreads those files are infected and can spread from one computer to another, and/or corrupt or destroy network data.
  • Worms: Can slow down computer networks by eating up bandwidth as well as the slow the efficiency of your computer to process data. A worm is a standalone malware that can propagate and work independently of other files, where a virus needs a host program to spread.
  • Trojan: A trojan is a backdoor program that creates an entryway for malicious users to access the computer system by using what looks like a real program, but quickly turns out to be harmful. A trojan virus can delete files, activate other malware hidden on your computer network, such as a virus and steal valuable data.
  • Spyware: Much like its name, spyware is a computer virus that gathers information about a person or organization without their express knowledge and may send the information gathered to a third party without the consumer’s consent.
  • Adware: Can redirect your search requests to advertising websites and collect marketing data about you in the process so that customized advertisements will be displayed based on your search and buying history. : This is a type of trojan cyberware that is designed to gain money from the person or organization’s computer on which it is installed by encrypting data so that it is unusable, blocking access to the user’s system.

Network Security is vital in protecting client data and information, it keeps shared data secure, protects from viruses and helps with network performance by reducing overhead expenses and costly losses from data breaches, and since there will be less downtime from malicious users or viruses, it can save businesses money in the long-term.

The Importance of Network Security

Network security is vital to maintaining the integrity of your data and the privacy of your organization and employees. It encompasses everything from the most basic practices, such creating strong passwords and fully logging out of community computers, to the most complex, high-level processes that keep networks, devices and their users safe. More and more sensitive information is stored online and in these various devices, and if an unauthorized user gains access to that data, it could lead to disastrous results.

Network security is the key to keeping that sensitive information safe, and as more private data is stored and shared on vulnerable devices, network security will only grow in importance and necessity. Experts expect that more than 2,314 exabytes (or over 2 trillion gigabytes) of data will exist by 2020; managing that amount of data is difficult enough, and protecting it will be another issue entirely.

While each and every member of your organization can take strides to help keep things secure, network security has become more complex in recent years. Adequately protecting networks and their connected devices requires comprehensive network training, a thorough understanding of how networks actually work and the skills to put that knowledge into practice. It’s crucial for networks to be thoroughly and properly set up, secured and monitored to fully preserve privacy.

Common Network Security Vulnerabilities

In order to effectively implement and maintain secure networks, it’s important to understand the common vulnerabilities, threats and issues facing IT professionals today. While some can be fixed fairly easily, others require more involved solutions.

Virtually all computer networks have vulnerabilities that leave them open to outside attacks; further, devices and networks are still vulnerable even if no one is actively threatening or targeting them. A vulnerability is a condition of the network or its hardware, not the result of external action.

What Is a Network Protocol?

What Is a Network Protocol?

What is Lan?

What Is a Local Area Network?

What Is WAN

What Is a Wide Area Network?

A wide area network (WAN) is a large network of information that is not tied to a single location. WANs can provide communication, the sharing of information, and much more between devices from around the world through a WAN provider.

Resources:

https://www.checkpoint.com/cyber-hub/network-security/what-is-network-security/
https://enterprise.comodo.com/blog/what-is-network-security/
https://www.comptia.org/content/guides/network-security-basics-definition-threats-and-solutions
Network security

Similarly, mobile phones are wireless devices and they are also easily exposed to threats. To shield these devices, a strong password should be used to access their various resources of it. It will be better to use a biometric fingerprint password to access smart devices.

Types of Security provisions at various levels in a system

14 Network Security Tools and Techniques to Know

Network security is a term that describes the security tools, tactics and security policies designed to monitor, prevent and respond to unauthorized network intrusion, while also protecting digital assets, including network traffic. Network security includes hardware and software technologies (including resources such as savvy security analysts, hunters, and incident responders) and is designed to respond to the full range of potential threats targeting your network.

It is predicted that by 2021, cybercrime damages will amount to an annual total world cost of $6 trillion, 1 even outpacing the yearly cost of damages attributed to natural disasters. And on an individual company level, these damages can be just as catastrophic. The average cost of a cyberattack is currently 800.67 million, 2 with operational and productivity loss, along with negative customer experience, being the primary consequences of suffering an attack.

Your data is the lifeblood of your business: It supports your growth, carries vital resources and helps your organization stay healthy. And if data is blood, then your network is the beating heart that pumps it through your system. But modern cyber threats are like vampires, doing everything possible to get at the blood that keeps your business going.

In order to defend against these vampiric threats and save your business from potentially millions of dollars in data loss, you need more than just a stake and some cloves of garlic; you need effective, robust network security and network visibility.

The Three Key Focuses of Network Security

Protection entails any security tools or policies designed to prevent network security intrusion. Detection refers to the resources that allow you to analyze network traffic and quickly identify problems before they can do harm. And finally, response is the ability to react to identified network security threats and resolve them as quickly as possible.

Unfortunately, most businesses simply do not know how to follow policy and do this properly. In fact, in a survey of 4,100 executives, departmental heads, IT managers and other key professionals across the U.S. and Europe, it was revealed that nearly three out of four organizations (73 percent) 3 are fielding a novice-level cybersecurity strategy. This is a growing threat because when network breaches occur and malicious threats come through, there’s more at stake than just the data itself.

Network security basics

Definitions are fine as top-level statements of intent. But how do you lay out a plan for implementing that vision? Stephen Northcutt wrote a primer on the basics of network security for CSOonline over a decade ago, but we feel strongly that his vision of the three phases of network security is still relevant and should be the underlying framework for your strategy. In his telling, network security consists of:

This, in short, is a defense in depth strategy. If there’s one common theme among security experts, it’s that relying on one single line of defense is dangerous, because any single defensive tool can be defeated by a determined adversary. Your network isn’t a line or a point: it’s a territory, and even if an attacker has invaded part of it, you still have the resources to regroup and expel them, if you’ve organized your defense properly.

Network security methods

To implement this kind of defense in depth, there are a variety of specialized techniques and types of network security you will want to roll out. Cisco, a networking infrastructure company, uses the following schema to break down the different types of network security, and while some of it is informed by their product categories, it’s a useful way to think about the different ways to secure a network.

  • Access control: You should be able to block unauthorized users and devices from accessing your network. Users that are permitted network access should only be able to work with the limited set of resources for which they’ve been authorized.
  • Anti-malware: Viruses, worms, and trojans by definition attempt to spread across a network, and can lurk dormant on infected machines for days or weeks. Your security effort should do its best to prevent initial infection and also root out malware that does make its way onto your network.
  • Application security: Insecure applications are often the vectors by which attackers get access to your network. You need to employ hardware, software, and security processes to lock those apps down.
  • Behavioral analytics: You should know what normal network behavior looks like so that you can spot anomalies or breaches as they happen.
  • Data loss prevention: Human beings are inevitably the weakest security link. You need to implement technologies and processes to ensure that staffers don’t deliberately or inadvertently send sensitive data outside the network.
  • Email security:Phishing is one of the most common ways attackers gain access to a network. Email security tools can block both incoming attacks and outbound messages with sensitive data.
  • Firewalls: Perhaps the granddaddy of the network security world, they follow the rules you define to permit or deny traffic at the border between your network and the internet, establishing a barrier between your trusted zone and the wild west outside. They don’t preclude the need for a defense-in-depth strategy, but they’re still a must-have.
  • Intrusion detection and prevention: These systems scan network traffic to identify and block attacks, often by correlating network activity signatures with databases of known attack techniques.
  • Mobile device and wireless security: Wireless devices have all the potential security flaws of any other networked gadget — but also can connect to just about any wireless network anywhere, requiring extra scrutiny.
  • Network segmentation: Software-defined segmentation puts network traffic into different classifications and makes enforcing security policies easier.
  • Security information and event management (SIEM): These products aim to automatically pull together information from a variety of network tools to provide data you need to identify and respond to threats.
  • VPN: A tool (typically based on IPsec or SSL) that authenticates the communication between a device and a secure network, creating a secure, encrypted "tunnel" across the open internet.
  • Web security: You need to be able to control internal staff’s web use in order to block web-based threats from using browsers as a vector to infect your network.

Resources:

https://blog.gigamon.com/2019/06/13/what-is-network-security-14-tools-and-techniques-to-know/
https://www.csoonline.com/article/3285651/what-is-network-security-definition-methods-jobs-and-salaries.html
https://www.softwaretestinghelp.com/network-security/
Network security

Therefore a highly-skilled email security application that can scan incoming messages for viruses and is capable of filtering suspicious data and controlling the outflow of messages to prevent any kind of information loss to the system is required.

Network Security Wiki

14 Types of Network Security Protections

Antivirus and Antimalware Software: This software is used for protecting against malware, which includes spyware, ransomware, Trojans, worms, and viruses. Malware can also become very dangerous as it can infect a network and then remain calm for days or even weeks. This software handles this threat by scanning for malware entry and regularly tracks files afterward to detect anomalies, remove malware, and fix the damage.

Application Security: It is essential to have application security since no app is created perfectly. Any application can comprise vulnerabilities or holes that attackers use to enter your network. Application security thus encompasses the software, hardware, and processes you select for closing those holes.

Behavioral Analytics: To detect abnormal network behavior, you will have to know what normal behavior looks like. Behavioral analytics tools can automatically discern activities that deviate from the norm. Your network security team will thus be able to efficiently detect indicators of compromise that pose a potential problem and rapidly remediate threats.

Data Loss Prevention (DLP): Organizations should guarantee that their staff does not send sensitive information outside the network. They should thus use DLP technologies, network security measures that prevent people from uploading, forwarding, or even printing vital information in an unsafe manner.

Email Security: Email gateways are considered the number one threat vector for a security breach. Attackers use social engineering tactics and personal information to build refined phishing campaigns to deceive recipients and then send them to sites serving up malware. An email security application can block incoming attacks and control outbound messages to prevent the loss of sensitive data.

Firewalls: Firewalls place a barrier between your trusted internal network and untrusted outside networks, like the Internet. A set of defined rules are employed to block or allow traffic. A firewall can be software, hardware, or both. The free firewall efficiently manages traffic on your PC, monitors in/out connections, and secures all connections when you are online.

Intrusion Prevention System (IPS): An IPS is network security capable of actively scanning network traffic to block attacks. The IPS Setting interface permits the administrator to configure the ruleset updates for Snort. It is possible to schedule the ruleset updates allowing them to run at particular intervals automatically, and these updates can be run manually on demand.

Mobile Device Security: Mobile devices and apps are increasingly being targeted by cybercriminals. 90% of IT organizations could soon support corporate applications on personal mobile devices. You indeed have to control which devices can access your network. It is also necessary to configure their connections to keep network traffic private.

Network Segmentation: Software-defined segmentation places network traffic into varied classifications and makes enforcing security policies a lot easier. The categories are ideally based on endpoint identity, not just IP addresses. Rights can be accessed based on location, role, and more so that the right people get the correct level of access and suspicious devices are thus contained and remediated.

Security Information and Event Management (SIEM): SIEM products bring together all the information needed by your network security staff to identify and respond to threats. These products are available in different forms, including virtual and physical appliances and server software.

Virtual Private Network (VPN): A VPN is another type of network security capable of encrypting the connection from an endpoint to a network, mainly over the Internet. A Remote VPN Access typically uses IPsec or Secure Sockets Layer to authenticate the communication between web and device.

Wireless Security: The mobile office movement is gaining momentum along with wireless networks and access points. However, wireless networks are not as secure as wired ones, which makes way for hackers to enter. It is thus essential for wireless security to be strong. It should be noted that without stringent security measures installing a wireless LAN could be like placing Ethernet ports everywhere. Products specifically designed for protecting a wireless network will have to be used to prevent an exploit from taking place.

Endpoint Security: Endpoint Security, also known as Network Protection or Network Security, is a methodology used for protecting corporate networks when accessed through remote devices such as laptops or several other wireless devices and mobile devices. For instance, Comodo Advanced Endpoint Protection software presents seven defense layers: virus scope, file reputation, auto-sandbox, host intrusion prevention, web URL filtering, firewall, and antivirus software. All this is offered under a single offering to protect them from both unknown and known threats.

3 Types of Network Security Controls

1. Technical Network Protection: Technical Network Protection is used to protect data within the network. Technical network protection guards both stored and in-transit data from malicious software and unauthorized persons.

2. Physical Network Protection: Physical Network Protection or Security is a network security measure designed to prevent unauthorized people from physically interfering with network components. Door locks and ID passes are essential components of physical network protection.

3. Administrative Network Protection: Administrative Network Protection is a network security method that controls a user’s network behavior and access. It also provides a standard operating procedure for IT officers when executing changes in the IT infrastructure. Company policies and procedures are forms of Administrative network protection.

The Importance of Network Security

Network security is vital to maintaining the integrity of your data and the privacy of your organization and employees. It encompasses everything from the most basic practices, such creating strong passwords and fully logging out of community computers, to the most complex, high-level processes that keep networks, devices and their users safe. More and more sensitive information is stored online and in these various devices, and if an unauthorized user gains access to that data, it could lead to disastrous results.

Network security is the key to keeping that sensitive information safe, and as more private data is stored and shared on vulnerable devices, network security will only grow in importance and necessity. Experts expect that more than 2,314 exabytes (or over 2 trillion gigabytes) of data will exist by 2020; managing that amount of data is difficult enough, and protecting it will be another issue entirely.

While each and every member of your organization can take strides to help keep things secure, network security has become more complex in recent years. Adequately protecting networks and their connected devices requires comprehensive network training, a thorough understanding of how networks actually work and the skills to put that knowledge into practice. It’s crucial for networks to be thoroughly and properly set up, secured and monitored to fully preserve privacy.

Common Network Security Vulnerabilities

In order to effectively implement and maintain secure networks, it’s important to understand the common vulnerabilities, threats and issues facing IT professionals today. While some can be fixed fairly easily, others require more involved solutions.

Virtually all computer networks have vulnerabilities that leave them open to outside attacks; further, devices and networks are still vulnerable even if no one is actively threatening or targeting them. A vulnerability is a condition of the network or its hardware, not the result of external action.

What Is a Network Protocol?

What Is a Network Protocol?

What is Lan?

What Is a Local Area Network?

What Is WAN

What Is a Wide Area Network?

A wide area network (WAN) is a large network of information that is not tied to a single location. WANs can provide communication, the sharing of information, and much more between devices from around the world through a WAN provider.

How to Make Your System and Network Safe?

To protect your system or network from malicious attacks, firstly put a strong password in your system for login and access and the password must consist of lots of characters, symbols, and numbers. Avoid using birthdays as a password as it can be easily cracked by hackers.

Always install your system and laptops with antivirus software. The antivirus software will scan, spot, and filter the infected files and also fix the problem that arises due to virus attacks in the system.

To update your system and network with the latest version of the antivirus software and install the latest patches and scripts for the system as per the need of the system is very crucial. This will minimize the chances of virus attacks and make the network more secure.

Similarly, mobile phones are wireless devices and they are also easily exposed to threats. To shield these devices, a strong password should be used to access their various resources of it. It will be better to use a biometric fingerprint password to access smart devices.

We should periodically take backups of files, documents, and other important data in our system or hard disk and should save them to a centralized server or some secure location. This should be done without fail. In case of an emergency, this will help to restore the system quickly.

Before downloading and clicking on any link or site on the Internet, we should keep in mind that one wrong click can give an invitation to many viruses on our network. Thus download the data from trusted and secure links only and avoid surfing on unknown links and websites.

Removable devices like pen drives, dongles, and data cards should always be scanned when induced in the system. The usage of removable devices should be limited and such a policy should be made through which it can’t export any data from the system.

Example of worm-win 32 attacker

On the other hand, computers or networks with a weak password, a date system update, and are not equipped with anti-virus software are more susceptible to the attacks of worms and easily get corrupted and diminished.

Conclusion

We have also seen how to make our networking system immune to all kinds of viruses and Trojan attacks by implementing strong passwords to the system, assigning multi-level security, using anti-virus software, and by updating all the software and system on time for example.

Resources:

https://enterprise.comodo.com/blog/what-is-network-security/
https://www.comptia.org/content/guides/network-security-basics-definition-threats-and-solutions
https://www.softwaretestinghelp.com/network-security/

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